Loading... Please wait...

We send 90% of our bed posts

We send 90% of our bed posts to local turner Mark Taylor to do the shaping. Along with stock for the posts, we give him a full-scale pattern showing the spindle design. Once the posts have been shaped, we determine the rail height. Then we lay put the center of the mortises on the correct faces of the post. We extend a bottom line around all the faces to use as reference line for drilling bed-bolt holes later.
To waste the bed-post mortised, you can use a plunge router and the jig shown in the photo below. The jig is easy to construct and is adjustable to fit most posts. We made our jig’s base out of particle-board and poplar, and we capped the rails with hardwood runners. We screwed together plywood and scraps to make the router carriage. If a post is tapered, we inset a couple of shims before clamping it between the jig’s rails. Next we double-check each mortise layout because the post is scrap if the location is wrong. Then using 1/2-in., two spiral end mil

We send 90% of our bed posts to local turner Mark Taylor to do the shaping. Along with stock for the posts, we give him a full-scale pattern showing the spindle design. Once the posts have been shaped, we determine the rail height. Then we lay put the center of the mortises on the correct faces of the post. We extend a bottom line around all the faces to use as reference line for drilling bed-bolt holes later.

To waste the bed-post mortised, you can use a plunge router and the jig shown in the photo below. The jig is easy to construct and is adjustable to fit most posts. We made our jig’s base out of particle-board and poplar, and we capped the rails with hardwood runners. We screwed together plywood and scraps to make the router carriage. If a post is tapered, we inset a couple of shims before clamping it between the jig’s rails. Next we double-check each mortise layout because the post is scrap if the location is wrong. Then using 1/2-in., two spiral end mil.

 

Rails- After we dimension the rails, we cut their tenons on a radial-arm saw fitted with a 10-in. dado head. To prevent transferring inaccuracies from slightly bowed or twisted stock, we space out the work from the saw’s fence, and we butt the end of the rail against a pointed stop. The stop contacts the same(center) spot on the rail when we flip it to cut the other check. To ensure a snug fit in the mortises, we cut the tenons thick, and we shave them down with a rabbet plane. After we have cleaned up the shoulders, we set the rail on edge, raise the saw-blade and then notch 5/8-in. on the top(but not the bottom) of the tenon. The notch allows the rail to expand and contract without exposing the post mortise. This orientation also helps us to tell which side of the rail is up during assemble (see drawing detail C on the previous page)

Headboard-Because headboards are wide, lots of wood movement will occur. Cutting a long mortise to accept a slightly under-width tenon will handle the problem, but it’s likely that the mortise will open up and leave an unsightly gap where the headboard meets the post. Therefore, we allow for expansion and contraction at the (cross grain) post-to-headboard joints by doing one of two things: we either shape a double mortise(leaving a center section of wood to stiffen the mortise) and notch the headboard ends to form twin tenons(see the drawing detail A on a p.10), or we split the tenons on the headboard and undersize the lower tenons, so they float on their post mortises.